Tag: Business tips

I have recently read quite a few rants online from translators complaining about “bad” clients. Mostly the complaints went something along the lines of clients making changes and reducing the quality of a translation, clients expecting unreasonable turnaround times, clients telling you that they could do your job if they had time, clients questioning your terminology choices, clients wanting to use Google Translate, etc. Who has not had one of those?

Nonetheless, I believe that the only bad client is a client that does not pay for a service delivered; in which case that is not just a bad client, but a criminal one. All other clients are either good clients, potentially good clients or not a good fit for your business.

I will not argue that every translator who has been in the business for a few years or so will have had the odd tough experience with a client. I get it that every now and then we get a client that tests our limits and our patience, but I believe that we, the translators, are responsible for most of these experiences and I can explain why.

First, a client who attempts to mistakenly correct a translation is a potentially good client, because this client is giving you an opportunity to showcase your expertise when you explain why they are mistaken. If they insist on changing the final translation anyway, then as long as you have noted your objections and they do not attach your name to the final product, there is no reason why this should bother you. I mean, they did buy the translation to do as they see fit after all.

A client who expects an unreasonable turnaround, may just be someone who has never translated anything and has no idea how long it takes. The same goes for a client who offers a very low rate. In both cases, you have an opportunity to explain your quality process and why your translation may take a little longer or cost a little more than they expect. This is also a potentially good client.

Clients who cannot be persuaded when they have unreasonable expectations in regards to deadline and rates, clients who do not believe you need to be a professional to do your job, even after you have shown how different a professional translation is from an amateur one, and clients who want to use Google Translate are just not a good fit for your business.

Many of us seem to operate under the premise that business is business and we need to take whatever comes our way. I think that is a massively flawed premise, and I am not the only one who thinks so. I have recently read an article summarizing the main trends arising from the Localization World Conference in Dublin, Ireland, and basically the third main trend is saying no or “firing” clients who do not fit into your business model.

I think firing is a harsh word, but, as a service provider, working for someone for whom you do not wish to work for, or do not have the competence to work for is doing both your business and your clients’ a disservice. For example, I do not wish to work for someone who has unreasonable expectations. If a client comes to me with an unreasonable deadline and cannot be persuaded that either the quality of the job will suffer, in which case we may need a “work in progress” approach to the translation, or the deadline has to be flexible, I will kindly advise this client to find another provider.

The problem is, if I take this job and deliver within the deadline, the quality will indeed suffer, and it is my name and my business that may become known for poor translations. This client, who was expecting a high quality product, may become unhappy with the final work delivered and choose to never come back, or worse, bad mouth my services. It is likely that this client will have a hard time too, because he will have to find another translator, thus overextending his deadline and budget anyway, or “make do” with a substandard translation. In short, no one will have a positive experience.

Some clients may be ok with a poorer translation, in which case I am also happy for them to find a cheaper provider. It is only fair, and I do not feel bad when they do not choose me for budgetary reasons. I cannot help but care for the outcome of my work, and I would not accept much less money, because I know I would work just as hard.

As business owners, we need to determine the kind of business we want to be and who we want to serve. In other words, what characteristics make a client a good fit for our business.

Client is potentially a good fit for your business

The clients who are a good fit for my business are those who want a personal service, who want an open channel to talk about their expectations and questions, who want quality and understand that this may take a little more time or cost a little more.

They want flexibility from me, in terms of deadlines, last minute changes, etc., but they are also prepared to be flexible if necessary and work with me to ensure the best possible outcome.

The clients who are a good fit for my business want to have a relationship with their translation provider, they want to know that they do not need to recruit a new translator each time they have a job in my language pair, and they want to know they can trust that they will have a product that I, and they, will be proud of.

The clients who are a good fit for my business know that a good translation will boost both their business and mine, and they know they can expect that commitment from me.

Clients who want different things, may be better off finding a different provider.

When we adopt a “good fit approach” we feel more at ease, because we work with people who want to work with us. Everybody has a positive experience that fulfills their expectations and no one feels like they are being over charged, underpaid, treated unfairly or unappreciated. The final product is actually final and of good quality and both businesses thrive.

In my most recent post: Why should freelance translators spend some time standardizing their processes? I discussed briefly the value of having some standardized processes to free up brain space and time to do the things you love, such as translating. I will not go into too much detail on that at this point, but feel free to read the post if you are interested.

The aim of this particular process is to ensure that you keep track of your clients and rates. If you are a beginner translator, you may not be feeling the need for such a process just yet, but this is the ideal time to begin.

Over the years as a freelance translator, you will work with many clients and for varying periods. Some will get on board at the beginning of your career and stay with you for many years; others will hire you for one-off projects, and some of these seemingly “one-off” projects will come back after a few years with a new project. Keeping track of who they are and how much you charged them for your last project with them is crucial to your business development.

Here are the two main reasons why:

  • Consistency and opportunities for increasing rates

Needless to say, even if you start out with the same rate, you will have different rates for these clients over time. Your rates will hopefully increase as your experience increases and you become more knowledgeable about the market. You can charge more from new clients coming on board now than for clients who have been with you from the beginning and paid your initial lower rate. In addition, you will have varying degrees of success in your negotiations with other clients, which will mean different rates as well. If you keep track of how much each client paid you for your most recent project with them, whenever a client comes back requesting a quote, all you have to do is quickly check your spreadsheet and you know what your negotiated rate with that client was. This information enables you to provide a quick quote, or start negotiating a new rate from your first reply.

Furthermore, as I mentioned before, some clients will disappear for a few years and come back unexpectedly with a large project. In such cases, it is handy to know how much you charged back then, so that you can decide, before they ask, whether you need to charge them more or not. Also, you may have charged them a higher rate at the time than what most of your clients are paying now, e.g. because they are a direct client and you are currently working predominantly with agencies, and if you just go ahead and charge your must current rate, you may waste an opportunity to earn more for that job.

Conversely, if your rates are much higher now, when a client comes back to you after a few years expecting your original rate, you are able to decide whether to go with the original rate, increase your rate slightly so as not to scare them, or gently let them know your current rate. Many clients will agree a project with you assuming your original rate, without even asking for a quote, so you are better off always making sure the rates that you are charging for a particular project are clearly stated in every case. Again, in any case, not having to go back through your files to try to find how much you charged originally is extremely handy.

  • You have a ready-made list of leads

Sometimes we work with clients, they come and go, and over the years, we forget to check when we last worked for them. This will not happen in the beginning of your career, but after a few years, you will see that you actually forget certain clients, because you were busy with other projects.

When you keep a list of your clients, your contacts in their companies and rates, you have a ready-made list of marketing leads. Whenever you have a low period, you can go through your list, identify those clients with whom you have not been in touch in a while, and send them a friendly reminder that you are available, or just say hello. This is incredibly effective in making sure that your clients remember you and whenever they have a project in your language pair, you will be the first person they think of.

In addition, if you decide to offer a discount for a limited period or any other deals, you can contact all of these people easily and it will not be cold emailing, because they are already familiar with you and your work.

In order to do this, I use a spreadsheet that I created (picture below), which I call Client Database. My spreadsheet contains:

  • Client: company or person
  • Last job: date of the last job
  • Service: translation, revision, proofreading, transcription, content analysis, etc.
  • Rates currency: GBP, USD, EUR (depending on what I negotiated with the client)
  • Rate: amount/unit, e.g. 40/hour or 0.1/word
  • Status: Active or inactive. If I am currently working on a project for this client, or if this client regularly contacts me for projects, I consider this an active client. Otherwise, I classify the client as inactive. The reason for this item is that I can easily filter my spreadsheet by active or inactive clients depending on my marketing strategy. For example, I may want to contact all clients with whom I have not been in touch in a while, so I filter my spreadsheet by inactive clients. If I decide to offer a discount to my current clients, I can filter the spreadsheet by active clients.
  • Last contact: date of last contact with a representative of this client, perhaps when they offered a project that fell through, etc. This may or may not be the same as the last job date, but it is useful for you to know that you may have been in touch with them, but unable to secure work with them for some reason.
  • Contact person: name of project manager or direct client
  • Contact details: e-mail address. I am unlikely to call my clients, so I use e-mail, but if you like calling on occasion to make it more personal, then also add a phone number.
  • Notes: this is more for inactive clients and, basically, I add any information that might be useful if I were to engage with this client again in the future, such as tried to negotiate rate down or delays payments, etc. For example, if I have a promotional discount for some time, I may contact a client who negotiated my rates down and ask if they want to take advantage of a limited discount offer.

Client database printscreen

I update this spreadsheet at the end of every month. Updating your spreadsheet regularly is essential to ensuring that you have recent data on when you last worked for a client, etc. In addition, it helps you remember all those clients and reach out to them when you need more projects. It is very easy to panic and look for new leads every time you find yourself in a low period, and forget that you have a ready-made database of people who already know you, know your work, and who would probably be willing to work with you again.

This is a simple enough spreadsheet and a simple enough process, so make sure you implement it and you will reap the benefits from having this data compiled before you know it! Do you have any better processes for keeping track of your clients and rates? If so, I would love to hear from you in the comments.

Happy translating!

As freelancers, we take pride in managing our own time, being our own boss, and theoretically being able to choose our jobs and clients. However, when it gets down to it, being your own boss also means being your own IT department, being your own human resources department, your own accounts department, and so on. The tricky part is, we are only paid for the translation work, all the other jobs that we carry out are either unpaid, or you have to factor that time into your translation rate.

Even if you are a “boutique” translator, who charges a hefty fee for your services, factoring the cost of all the hours that you put into invoicing, learning how to use translation resources, figuring out IT problems, chasing payments, prospecting clients, etc. into your per hour or per word rate, would likely make you prohibitively expensive. Hence, there are two options, one is outsourcing some or all of these tasks, and the other is reducing the amount of time that you spend on each of these tasks.

In either case, you can benefit from standardizing some of your processes to ensure that you or the person who will perform a service for you is able to perform tasks quickly and keep appropriate records. If you think of yourself as a company, you may take some initial time (start-up) time to create certain documents and tools, but these will pay off later in time saved that you can use to earn money from translating or relax and enjoy the money that you have earned.

If you choose to outsource all of your non translation-related tasks, you need to find affordable services and determine how much of your earnings you are prepared to spend on “business costs”. The advantages of outsourcing services include freeing up brain space for translation, freeing up time, and not having to actually spend time doing things that you dislike versus translating, which you love. The disadvantages are primarily the cost of outsourcing, giving up some of your control over important aspects of your business and having more people to manage, which means that you will also have to manage their deadlines, deliverables, etc.

I particularly prefer a combination outsourcing and doing it myself. There are tasks, such as filing tax returns, which can be outsourced for a relatively low cost. Other tasks, such as your marketing, are potentially more effectively done by you. More importantly, if you chose to become a freelancer, you probably believe that you work well independently and are used to “figuring things out” for yourself. Hence, you probably do not think that you need to spend money on many of these tasks. Well, I believe that too, and in the very least, if you do spend some money, you should really only spend where necessary.

As freelancers, we do not operate as companies, and when we “hire” someone, we usually pay another freelancer on an hourly basis as well. Hence, it is important that the other freelancer is able to hit the ground running and do as much as possible for you in the hours that you are hiring them.

For example, if you hire someone to do your client prospecting for you, he or she will be contacting potential clients on your behalf. This is obviously great, provided that their approach truly represents how you want to portray yourself, and how good they are at recordkeeping. Let us say that you hire a sales person and give them a list of potential clients to contact, you tell them to create a template for initial communications through e-mails and letters, and send them off on their trail. Two or three months down the line, you may be a bit short on cash and decide that you do not need their services right now, so you fire them. How do you know who they contacted and what their responses were? How do you know who you need to follow up on? In a few months, when you decide to hire a new sales person, how will they know where to start?

In this example, you should have provided or had the first sales person create a brief on what to put in their communications, a list of contacts, a spreadsheet to track who had been contacted, and a results-tracker. Furthermore, you should have arranged periodic monitoring of their work to make sure that they were using your tools appropriately and that they were having some success. This would have meant spending a few hours initially, either creating the materials and/or briefing the sales person (paid hours). After this initial time, you would have to meet with the sales person for 1-2 hours per month to keep track of their progress and use of your materials.

 I know that not many translators will go as far as hiring a sales person, but this concept of having an outline of what you need from a task, templates to streamline accomplishing the task and a results-tracker applies to all of your potential processes, from accounting, to sales, to collections.

This is the first of a series of posts in which I am going to share some of my standardized practices with you. These are quick and simple processes that you can apply to ensure that you are on top of your finances, your marketing, your clients and your rates. The main concept behind all of them is setting out what you want from your tasks, creating as many templates as possible in advance and devising means to keep track of your results.

If you spend some time doing this for all your processes, and apply your processes consistently, not only will you be much quicker at doing them, but also if you ever choose to outsource, the person who takes over from you will be able to do so quickly and with little training.

Stay tuned and let me know your thoughts! Happy translating!

As freelancers, we take pride in managing our own time, being our own boss, and theoretically being able to choose our jobs and clients. However, when it gets down to it, being your own boss also means being your own IT department, being your own human resources department, your own accounts department, and so on. The tricky part is, we are only paid for the translation work, all the other jobs that we carry out are either unpaid, or you have to factor that time into your translation rate.

Even if you are a “boutique” translator, who charges a hefty fee for your services, factoring the cost of all the hours that you put into invoicing, learning how to use translation resources, figuring out IT problems, chasing payments, prospecting clients, etc. into your per hour or per word rate, would likely make you prohibitively expensive. Hence, there are two options, one is outsourcing some or all of these tasks, and the other is reducing the amount of time that you spend on each of these tasks.

In either case, you can benefit from standardizing some of your processes to ensure that you or the person who will perform a service for you is able to perform tasks quickly and keep appropriate records. If you think of yourself as a company, you may take some initial time (start-up) to create certain documents and tools, but this will pay off later in time saved that you can use to earn money from translating or relax and enjoy the money that you have earned.

If you choose to outsource all of your non translation-related tasks, you need to find affordable services and determine how much of your earnings you are prepared to spend on “business costs”. The advantages of outsourcing services include freeing up brain space for translation, freeing up time, and not having to actually spend time doing things that you dislike versus translating, which you love. The disadvantages are primarily the cost of outsourcing, giving up some of your control over important aspects of your business and having more people to manage, which means that you will also have to manage their deadlines, deliverables, etc.

I particularly prefer a combination of outsourcing and doing it myself. There are tasks, such as filing tax returns, which can be outsourced for a relatively low cost. Other tasks, such as your marketing, are potentially more effectively done by you. More importantly, if you chose to become a freelancer, you probably believe that you work well independently and are used to “figuring things out” for yourself. Hence, you probably do not think that you need to spend money on many of these tasks. Well, I believe that too, and in the very least, if you do spend some money, you should really only spend where necessary.

As freelancers, we do not operate as companies, and when we “hire” someone, we usually pay another freelancer on an hourly basis as well. Hence, it is important that the other freelancer is able to hit the ground running and do as much as possible for you in the hours that you are hiring them.

For example, if you hire someone to do your client prospecting for you, he or she will be contacting potential clients on your behalf. This is obviously great, provided that their approach truly represents how you want to portray yourself, and how good they are at recordkeeping. Let us say that you hire a sales person and give them a list of potential clients to contact, you tell them to create a template for initial communications through e-mails and letters, and send them off on their trail. Two or three months down the line, you may be a bit short on cash and decide that you do not need their services right now, so you fire them. How do you know who they contacted and what their responses were? How do you know who you need to follow up on? In a few months, when you decide to hire a new sales person, how will they know where to start?

In this example, you should have provided or had the first sales person create a brief on what to put in their communications, a list of contacts, a spreadsheet to track who had been contacted, and a results-tracker. Furthermore, you should have arranged periodic monitoring of their work to make sure that they were using your tools appropriately and that they were having some success. This would have meant spending a few hours initially, either creating the materials and/or briefing the sales person (paid hours). After this initial time, you would have had to meet with the sales person for 1-2 hours per month to keep track of their progress and use of your materials.

 I know that not many translators will go as far as hiring a sales person, but this concept of having an outline of what you need from a task, templates to streamline accomplishing the task and a results-tracker applies to all of your potential processes, from accounting, to sales, to collections.

Whether your intent is to hire someone to do a job for you, or to do it yourself. You will benefit from creating materials in advance. Such materials should always include your goals and how you will measure your results, as well as, templates to streamline that particular task.

This is the first of a series of posts in which I am going to share some of my standardized practices with you. These are quick and simple processes that you can apply to ensure that you are on top of your finances, your marketing, your clients and your rates. The main concept behind all of them is setting out what you want from your tasks, creating as many templates as possible in advance and devising means to keep track of your results.

If you spend some time doing this for all your processes, and apply your processes consistently, not only will you be much quicker at doing them, but also if you ever choose to outsource, the person who takes over from you will be able to do so quickly and with little training.

Stay tuned and let me know your thoughts! Happy translating!

This week I was reading a post by a fellow blogger and translator, Olga Arakelyan, about the 10 worst mistakes she made as a translator, and number 6 “I couldn’t say no to clients” resonated with me. Naturally, not saying no was not my only mistake, but it is one with which I have been struggling for over 13 years. Today, I want to share a few lessons that I learned from saying “no” more often.

When should we say no?

  • When a job does not pay a fee that we consider reasonable. In my post about setting rates, I discuss how there should be some flexibility in terms of pricing. Of course, we will have to negotiate sometimes, but you should set a minimum threshold under which you will not work.
  • When a job has an unreasonable deadline. You will have to work overnight, over the weekend and just barely have enough time to deliver the job. This is a disaster waiting to happen, believe me, just say no.
  • When a job is not within your area of expertise and you are not comfortable that the time available to do it will allow you to research it properly and deliver your customary high quality work. Again, another disaster waiting to happen!

These are straightforward reasons, so…

Why do we fail to say no?

When we start a career as freelance translators, most of us do not know much about business, let alone about a freelancing translation business. This means that we have to learn as we go, mostly from trial and error. We often start, like many businesses, without clients or with very few clients and have to build a client base from there. In this process, we will learn about website design, marketing, social media, etc. We will play every role in our business, from admin to strategic planning. However, what we are at heart is translators and what we really want to do is translate. Therefore, it is very easy to use the very purpose of our business as an excuse to take any job – i.e. “it is best to be translating than not doing anything or not making any money at all.” I have fallen into that trap repeatedly. Many times, I have accepted jobs just because “I was not doing anything that day” or “It was good practice and I learned a lot”.

Another excuse that we use to take any job – when I say any job I mean jobs outside our area of expertise, with unreasonable deadlines or underpaid – is that we cannot afford the luxury of picking and choosing our clients, at least not yet. This is a tricky excuse because it seems very valid and, when we are struggling to make ends meet, sometimes we feel like there is no other way. Naturally, it is our business and ultimately you will do what we need to do, but I will tell you in the next part of this post why perhaps you should really consider saying no and taking that chance.

Finally, we “feel sorry” for our clients. Particularly with long-term clients and project managers, when they are desperate, because they “need something translated by tomorrow,” or “you are the only person they trust to do the job at such short notice,” or “unfortunately their budget is very limited for this project, but they really want the job done by you,” or whatever it is they tell you, you feel like you cannot say no. You feel like they need you and it would be bad customer service to say no. After all, we should “go the extra mile” for our clients.

In my experience, the above are the three main reasons why we struggle to say no, but…

What are the downfalls of not saying no enough?

  • Whenever the quality of your work suffers, your business as a whole suffers. Whether you work with agencies, direct clients or both, repeat business and referrals will always depend on the quality of your work, your timeliness and your professionalism. Accepting a job with an unreasonable deadline is a recipe for disaster, because you will be working in a hurry, tired and, as with any work that requires attention to detail, will be likely to make mistakes. Mistakes are a part of any service provided by humans, but when clients pay you for a service, even if it is a rush job or a low rate, they assume that if you accepted it, you will deliver a job to the standard they expect from you. Hence, do not expect them to be OK with your mistakes, because you took a rush job from them, even if you did it to “help them”. This happened to me once with a translation agency; the project manager begged me to take on this translation for the next day, because there was no one else, etc. I told him, I would do my best, but the deadline was tight and it would be difficult. In the end, I managed to do the job to a high standard, but was late ten minutes. He discounted 30% of my pay because the agency’s policy was to penalize translators for delays. I was furious, of course! I only took the job to “help him”, I busted my ass trying to get it done to the quality expected of me, and I was only late 10 minutes. The result was that I lost 30% of my fee, ended up arguing with the PM and it did not make any difference. I had signed an agreement and, ultimately, he was entitled to enforce their policy. My relationship with this agency was dented. The incident left a bitter taste in everybody’s mouth. Until then, I had worked with this agency for at least 3 years and had never had a late job. The result of me trying to “help them” was that I lost some of my earnings, my reputation with them suffered and our working relationship as a whole was made worse, not better. Even when a client is aware that the quality of a job may suffer due to a tight deadline, no client will ever be happy to find mistakes, or to have a delayed delivery on a job that they are paying for. Hence, you do yourself no favours by accepting such jobs. The upside of being a freelancer is being able to pick and choose, so do just that and let someone else take the fall for a poor job, or let your client juggle things around to find you a better deadline.

  • We work in a global industry, working from home over the Internet – as many of us do – means that we have clients everywhere in the world and our competition is also global. Hence, becoming known and reputable takes time, but losing a client and potentially your reputation only takes one bad job. Finding clients in a global arena broadens our scope, but also creates some challenges. It is not easy for clients to background check us, it is not easy for us to stand out in a pile of CVs from all over the world and building relationships takes longer.  In practice, this means two things 1) we do not want to have to find new clients every week, we want those who take a chance on us to stays with us for all their translation needs in our language pair and 2) we want to be able to develop a reputation that is verifiable. Having these two things is gold in our business and we should value them above immediate earnings, because our clients will value and reward us for it. Hence, resist the temptation of accepting any jobs that might jeopardize your reputation. If you want to be in this business for the long run, be humble and accept when something is beyond your scope of knowledge. Clients will not think less of you for it, they will respect your for being professional.

  • You do not have time to run your business. Again, it is easy to fall into the trap of “at least I am translating” and overlook the fact that for you to be able to continue translating in the long-term your business needs to thrive as a business. Sometimes, the small fee that you will make from a job, however tempting it may be, may be preventing you from finding a new client who could award you a much bigger job. In addition, your administrative tasks must be handled. When I used to manage a team of translators working for me, we had a policy that by a certain date they had to submit their invoices for a particular month in order to ensure timely payment. Month after month, I was astonished at how many of them simply forgot to invoice me. You have already done the work; you need to be paid for it! Your business should run in a way that you are paid for every job you complete. You make zero money if you take a small new job instead of taking the time to invoice a job that you have already completed, you may actually lose money, which is stupid, for lack of a better word.

  • You have no time to study and learn. Researching, reading, building your pool of resources are all part of developing yourself as a translator. These things should be incorporated into your routine and regarded as just as important as translating itself. There are computer-assisted technologies being launched all the time, new resources available online and offline, classes, books, etc. These are all things that you need to keep up with in order to continue offering high quality services to your clients and to continue developing professionally. Furthermore, sometimes your mind needs a break and some inspiration that does not come from frantically translating. These activities are not to be left for your free time; they are essential to your business and should be regarded and prioritized as such.

In short, make a list of things that are worth saying no for and stick to them. You can also make a list of things that are worth saying yes to and stick to them. If you have set parameters for how you operate, it is easier to make these decisions when situations present themselves and your business can only grow from having a clear direction. Good luck!

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This week I was asked by a fellow translator if I think she should become a paid member of one of these job boards online, such as Proz and Translator’s café. In this post, I discuss my experience and why I think it depends on your strategy.

I have been an unpaid member of ProZ for over 6 years, and I have profiles created in most of the major job boards for translators online. I have already discussed why I think you should take the time to create a profile in a previous post. In short, these websites’ ratings improve your visibility, because it is easier than boosting your own website’s ratings or even creating one to begin one.

Creating hundreds of profiles is a time-consuming task, but I think it is worth it. There is a cheat though: I actually hired a virtual assistant, provided her with copy of the general text, my CV information, login and password to be used and she created the accounts for me. Now, I have a spreadsheet, where I have all the websites where I have profiles, login and password, and latest updates. Hence, it is easy for me to track where my information is and update it every so often (for which I also use my virtual assistant).

I can safely say that I have had potential clients contact me at one point or another through most of these websites, but still I would not recommend them as a marketing strategy. These profiles are nice to have, but do not expect them to generate a lot of spontaneous business for you, most of your business will come from active marketing. You can read some of my tips on that as well here and here.

However, I digress…these are unpaid profiles, but what about paid membership? Is it worth it?

Over one year ago, I wondered that myself, and after being a member of ProZ for over five years, I decided to make the investment and pay for a year of membership. I read several testimonials by other translators on the ProZ website saying that they got the return on their investment, so my goal was to at least get my money back in jobs won.

Hence, I bid for all suitable projects in my language pair, which I had not been doing as a free member, and made an effort to tailor all my bids to the job offers. As a result, I won quite a few jobs in my first six months of membership, and made some contacts that did not award me the particular job I bid for, but came back to me later for other jobs. The bottom line is that, like the testimonials that I read, I did get my money back.

The fact that I had paid, made me more diligent in bidding and tailoring my bids, which could have accounted for the positive results. Nonetheless, I did find that, as a member, I was allowed to bid first, so my bids were noticed more often than when I bid as a free member. This is the true value of the paid membership. I believe that a job poster will not read more than 10-20 bids, so by the time you bid as a free member, they will potentially have already selected their provider.

Another interesting aspect of the membership was having access to the Blue Board, which is a board where translators rate job posters. I could check whether a poster paid on time, was serious and ethical, etc. This obviously made me feel a lot more confident when accepting jobs.

Bottom line is that you should definitely pay for membership, at least with ProZ, right? Well, I have not renewed my membership this year.

Despite the “success”, the jobs posted there usually offered lower rates than I expect to earn. The “clients” on the ProZ website are not my target market, because I target a more specialist type of agency and end client, who usually have longer selection processes and testing, so they will rarely post a job on a job board. My clients usually pre-emptively recruit and create lists of approved suppliers so that they can easily outsource jobs to trusted partners.

Hence, I found that the time I spent tailoring bids and looking for suitable projects was better spent sending my CV and marketing information to potential clients in my target segment. I spent the last six months of my membership with ProZ sending CVs and marketing information, and taking tests. The result was that I got fewer responses and fewer replies, but the companies that became my clients in that period paid me at least three times more than my Proz clients did. In other words, in the second half of my membership year, I was able to earn a lot more, doing what I specialize in.

The lesson I learned is that both of these approaches are valid ways of finding clients and winning jobs. However, your choice of one or the other depends on your strategy. In fact, you do not even have to choose, you could do both and maximize your earnings by choosing the highest paying jobs by order of request. I find that doing both takes more than my allotted marketing time and I need to translate as well, so it is not feasible in my business, but it all depends on your demand.

A paid membership is certainly something to consider when you are going through a low demand period or building your business. When you reach a more stable level, you can then make a choice about whether this is helping you get to your target market or consuming more time than it is worth.

My main take away from this experience was that we should be open to trying new approaches and assessing them pragmatically. Sometimes, a return on investment does not make an approach attractive in the long term. As translators, we need to think as business owners and make these decisions. However, we will only be able to focus on the best approach for us, once we have tried a few different strategies and tailored our choices to our business.

Now over to you, have you had any experience with paid memberships in other job boards? How did it go?

 

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2 comments

Determining your rates is often a common and controversial issue among translators. The answer that I will provide today is by no means the only one. You may come up with other pricing strategies that work for you, your target market and current clientele. I hope this provides a starting point, based upon which you can devise your own strategy.

Firstly, your rate must:

  • Be competitive – in theory, you can charge whatever you want, but that will only work if people pay what you are asking for. Most clients will get quotes from more than one translator or service, so if you are too far off the mark they will either think that you are not professional enough (hence why your rate is so low) or that you are out of touch with the market (hence why your rate is so high). That does not mean that you cannot be the cheapest or the most expensive translator that money can hire; it just means that your rate should show that you are aware of what the market pays for your service and your pricing strategy is deliberate. Hence, you are either “in the middle” or “just above” or “just below” the going rate.
  •  Make a statement – our CV is not our only means of making a statement about our work. What and how we charge for our services also affect how we are viewed by prospect clients. Companies choose what strategy is more in line with their value proposition and adjust their pricing strategy based on that. For example, a company may set its prices low and dare you to find a cheaper provider. This shows you that they are aware of what the going rate is for similar products, but deliberately want to be the cheapest and attract as many customers as possible. We all know what to expect from this company, as the popular saying goes: “You get what you pay for.” Sometimes, the lowest price is exactly what you want and need; we are not always looking for the highest quality. For example, you may have just received a letter from your boyfriend in Spain. The letter is in Spanish, but you do not speak Spanish. Hence, you need a translation service. You will not be looking for the highest quality translation that money can buy, you will probably want speed (because you cannot wait to know what he said) and to get the general idea for the lowest price, because you cannot invest lots of money on reading letters from your boyfriend. Sometimes quality is not the top concern, i.e. speed and budget are more important and a low pricing strategy may be more appealing to this customer.

Conversely, at the high-end market, companies will set their prices above the going rate to convey to you that their product is more expensive because it is the best available. As a translator, your pricing strategy can do that too, you may set your price to reflect the quality of the services you provide, your experience, credentials, specialization, etc. It is as if you are trying to convey that you are the “Ferrari” equivalent in translation. If you choose this strategy, remember that not everyone can afford a Ferrari, not matter how much they want it, so your services will not be accessible to most clients.

Hence, your pricing strategy may say – “I am willing to translate for a lower fee and this means that I am interested in volume” – or it may say – “I am a high-quality and experienced professional, who charges according to my credentials”. On both ends of the scale, the client will know exactly what to expect. However, you do not need to pick an end of the scale. If your rates are in the middle, you convey the message that you are in line with your competition, i.e. that you are not necessarily better or worse based on your pricing, which means you’ll need to convey your competitive advantage in some other way. This makes you more accessible to the average customer, but it means more competition because you will need to find other ways of standing out among the many providers within the same rate range.

  •  Be flexible (to an extent) – You do not need to charge the top and bottom of the scale and every amount in between. You need to have your preferred rate (ideal rate), your acceptable rate (a rate that you would consider if the job were not too specialized, etc.) and your unacceptable rate (you simply do not work for that). Corinne McKay has an interesting system for that with a green, yellow and red zone. According to her, if it were within your capabilities, you would almost never turn down work in your green zone. You would never take work in your red zone and would consider work in your yellow zone depending on your availability, the level of difficulty, etc.

 All very well, so how do you determine your rates?

Initially, you need to make some decisions about:

–          What statement you want your rates to make (high-end, low-end or on a par with competition);

–          How flexible you can be (do I need to go into my yellow zone at all? If so, what factors would make me consider doing that, e.g. availability, how interesting a project is, etc.);

–          Who your target market is (medical industry, translation agencies, law firms, etc.);

–          What types of clients you will want to attract (companies or individuals? Translation agencies, direct clients or both?); and, more importantly,

–          How much do you need and want to earn. (Ideally, you would earn what you want, and that is, ultimately, what you will aim for, but it is important to know how much you need to earn to keep your business feasible, because this will affect all your other decisions about pricing).

Next, you will need to determine what the market charges for the services that you provide. I have a very simple strategy for that.

I have a list of the translation agencies who operate in my industry (medical) in the countries were I aim to work. I have rated them based on how close to my value proposition they are. For example, I strive to provide the highest quality translations; I aim for the high-end of the market, etc. In other words, specialist medical translation agencies are my target for determining what the market is charging.

Then I hire a virtual assistant (they can be very cheap online) for a few hours, every year or two, and get my VA to call all of these agencies to get quotes. It is important for me that the VA gets quotes on all of the services that I provide, e.g. translation, revision, proofreading, etc.  I am very specific about what the VA needs to find out, because sometimes an agency will provide a quote that will include revision, proofreading, DTP, etc. If I am not offering these services in a bundle, that rate is useless to me unless it is broken down.

I usually provide my VA with a short medical document to submit to these agencies, so that she can act exactly as I client would trying to get quotes and choose a provider for their job.

My reasoning here is that I do not have the resources to pay for a market research. However, large translation agencies do, so I can use their rates as benchmark for my own.

I am aware that I do not compete with large translation agencies, because there are certain additional services that they can provide which I do not. Hence, I know that my rates need to be lower than theirs are (that is one of my competitive advantages in relation to translation agencies).

By averaging these rates out (per currency), I have a maximum benchmark, based upon which I can set my prices for translation agencies and direct clients. Hence, what I usually do is go 20-30% lower for direct clients and 50% lower for agencies (because they will need to embed their costs and profits, so they will not pay me 60-70% of their final rate to direct clients). Then I try these rates out, by offering them to new prospect customers and seeing what responses I get.

If it is really easy and everybody accepts my rate readily, this could mean that I am bang on average. So, in 2-3 months I try raising the rates slightly to determine whether the market will take it.

If it is really hard to get any clients and I am sensing that I am too expensive, after 1-2 months I lower the rates slightly (may through offers and temporary discounts) and see if I get more interest.

I do not change my rates often for regular clients, so all my trials with new rates are carried out with prospect clients. I believe this is important, because no one wants to work on a regular basis with a provider that keeps changing rates.

I am sure that there are many other approaches to this. I have developed this one over 13 years working as a translator, after a lot of trial and error, and it has been the most effective way for me. This article is too long already, so I will not go into details of having different rates for different target markets, etc. but do bear that in mind when you determine your rates.

Now over to you, do you have a better strategy? How do you determine your rates?

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A fellow translator has recently asked me a similar question. He is an experienced translator, but has always worked for the same company/few companies and now wants to break on his own.

First, a disclaimer – I have never done that. I have never held an in-house position. It took me a day working in-house for a translation agency to decide that it was not for me. However, I have transitioned from a full-time job as a medical researcher into freelancing and I believe I may have some useful advice for my fellow translator.
The following tips assume that the reader is already a translator. I am not going into details of qualifications you should/could get, experience, etc. I am assuming you are ready to go, as this is a vast topic that would require several other posts!

This list is by no means exhaustive, but includes some of the steps that I believe to be key to breaking into the translation industry. I will elaborate on some of these topics in future posts, but this may give you a general overview of what you need to do.

1. Prepare an appealing CV, and then create several versions of it. Preparing your CV may be the most important thing that you will do when setting up as a freelancer. It will require you to think about what your skills are, what your target and potential clients could be and ultimately how you are going to approach them. If you choose to approach translation agencies, they will always require a CV. A CV for translation agencies is quite standard in format, except that you do not need to provide your home address in your first contact, as if you were applying for a job. It is worth having at least two versions of this CV. One version you will send to generalist agencies – i.e. agencies that provide translations in any topic. The other CV should target niche agencies, i.e. agencies that specialize in your specialist areas, e.g. medical, legal, marketing, etc.

Then you should have a CV for your direct clients. Make sure you prepare a version of this CV for each type of client that you are going to target, e.g. medical device manufacturers, market research agencies, etc. This CV does not need to be in your standard CV format; it is a marketing tool and if you are going to send it to hundreds of potential clients, you don’t want your personal details spread all over the internet. Furthermore, few potential direct clients will care about where you went to school, etc. unless this is relevant to your specialism. Hence, although you will call it a CV, it should be more like a brochure, highlighting your relevant skills for a particular market.

2. Sing-up to translator job-boards. There are many websites (I mean hundreds) where people can find and hire freelancers, as well as websites specifically for translators. Some of these websites include Freelancer.com, People per hour (for freelancers in general), and ProZ and Translator’s cafe (for translators). Sign-up for as many as you can, create profiles in all of them (make sure you are consistent). You do not need to pay for membership in all of them (not even most!); the idea is to have your profile there. The better ranked these websites are in search engines the more they will help boosting your profile; this is easier than boosting your own website ranking (and you may not have one of those yet!).

Make sure you sign-up for their job notifications.

3. Bid for as many projects as you can. Some of these websites let you bid on projects free, while others require membership. Bid for all projects that suit your skills and are free initially. Over time, based on the notifications you receive, you will figure out which paid websites seem to have the most jobs that you would be interested in bidding for, and then you may pay for membership in those particular websites. Even if you do not get many bids accepted initially, or at all, use this as a tool to learn as much as you can about what skills you have, pricing, wording in your bids, etc. that are getting attention. Test different approaches, wordings to your bids, pricing, etc.

4. Figure out your price. Call agencies and ask for quotes, join translator forums that discuss this, read blogs for translators (there is a lot of good advice out there) and find out what other translators are charging. This is key, because you want to have a competitive price, but also set up a benchmark. You do not want to start by breaking into a slice of the market where you do not want to be, e.g. very low paying agencies.

5. Activate your network. Tell everybody you know about what you are doing now, and then remind them gently. Some of my first and best jobs came from friends’ and former colleagues’ recommendations. Initial marketing efforts like mailing and bidding do not necessarily convert into jobs immediately. You need to persevere with those, because they will eventually work. However, the quickest way to get a translation job is through recommendations.
Do not make the mistake of only letting the people who you think might have some connections with your industry know. Let everybody know! Send out an e-mail, call your closest friends, discuss what you are doing with your family, etc. We never know what people are talking about and who they are meeting; I have had some really good leads come from people who knew in passing what I did, but happened to be asked for a translator and could only think of me. In addition, social media is a good way of reminding people, because if you are posting often, your acquaintances often see your face there, and even if they do not engage with you all the time, they are reminded that you exist and work with translations. That is all it takes when an opportunity arises!

6. Create your image. This is worth spending time on. First, you need to define what channels you will use, how you want to be perceived and how much you can/are willing to invest now, in a year, in five years, etc. When I first started, I was quite bold and quit my job before I actually had enough translation demand. This meant that I had little money to invest and had to be very careful. Hence, I could not afford a professionally designed website, so I signed-up for a web host that had one of those website builders and built my own website. Admittedly, it was not my best website and now I have a much more professional image, but it was coherent with my profiles and had the information that I needed people to know.

I worked very hard on the free tools that I had, such as my LinkedIn profile and my ProZ profile, which I would sometimes use as my “websites”. It does not matter how many channels you choose or can afford to use. Of course having a website, your own domain name, a professional signature and e-mail, a logo, etc. all contribute to conveying your professional image. However, ultimately it will be your coherence and the quality and timeliness of your work that will determine your success. No amount of marketing will make you a good translator, so put more of your effort into that. Do be careful though, make well thought through decisions about how you want to portray yourself, because it will be easy to “upgrade” your image as you progress, but not so easy to change it.

7. Find your target companies online and approach them. I have written a couple of posts on some marketing strategies for translations, including mailing and other tools. You may learn more about them in my posts and through several other bloggers, but I do recommend you refrain from doing this until you have created your image, profile, and decided on your pricing, because you may not have a second chance to make a good impression with a potentially really good client.

These are only 7 tips. As I said at the beginning of this post, there are many other things that you can do, such as joining professional bodies, etc. I will write more on this topic, but if you start working on these now, I am sure they will keep you busy! What else can beginner translators do?

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This post is also an answer to a question asked by a colleague after reading my post10 Things that Freelance Translators Should do Every Day. Item 3 suggests that you contact two former colleagues or clients every day to touch-base. She expressed her concern about annoying people and asked me for some pointers on how to avoid that.

Well, here is my take on the art of keeping in touch.

First, why should you keep in touch with people who have been your clients and colleagues?

The obvious answer, particularly concerning your former clients, is because they may need you again.

However, there is more to it – they know about you, they know what you do and (hopefully) they know how good you are. These people are potential walking adverts for you, and you want to make sure that if they ever have reason to think of a translator in your language pair, you are the first person who will come to mind. This will mean that they will not only think of you when they have a job for you, but also when someone asks for a reference, when they need help finding things that are in your language or country, etc.

So how do you ensure that you are always fresh on their minds without annoying them?

The first rule of positive interaction is making sure that both sides are getting something out of the conversation. The only people on whom you can pour your information, without giving them something or being ignored, are your closest friends and your mum. Except for your mum, not even your friends are being completely altruistic there, because they expect to be able to do the same to you when they need too.

Everybody else will need to feel like they are also getting something out of that conversation.

Therefore, when you contact people, your main concern must not be what am I going to say to promote myself/my business, but how will this person benefit from this interaction.

There are several types of “perceived benefits”.  Here are some that you can offer in your interactions to make them mutually beneficial:

– Financial incentives: this is sales 101, if you offer a discount or a gift along with your services, your potential/former clients are more likely to see the ‘benefit’ of that interaction for them. However, you cannot use this resource too often, because it does get annoying, and you give the impression that you are struggling or that your products/services are of low value. I tend to use this once or twice a year. If I have had a good year, I usually offer one month of discounted rates to my clients as a thank you. Hence, I get to promote the success of my business to them and, at the same time, they get a month in which they may pay less for the same quality of service that they are used to.

– Mutual interests: My strategy here is to connect. Whenever I engage with someone, I try to find something that I find memorable about him or her. To me that means something in common, because I have a shocking memory.

This usually involves me asking many questions and trying to connect with that person in some level. The upside of that is that I often do find things or interests in common with people, and this leads to positive and rewarding interactions (sometimes business connections even become friends). If you can find a connection, it then becomes easy to interact, because you will have that shared interest to draw from.

For example, men do that all the time with sports. A friend of mine is a big football fan, so the first thing he does when engaging with other men is trying to find if they are also into football. He is not subtle about it at all, he will just ask, “do you have a football team?”, and if the person does, he is in. What follows is usually a conversation about football, and he gets a piece of information that he will not forget about that person. He does that in every level, from taxi drivers to business partners and it works every time. Next time he wants to engage with that person, he can just share information about football, which he is always reading anyway, or ask the other person’s opinion about football news, etc.

How does this apply to your daily e-mails? You do not need to send marketing information every time you want to engage. Your goal is to be remembered. Your former clients and colleagues already know what you do, so unless you are doing something new or have a new offer, there is no need to keep repeating that information to them.

The best way of ensuring that you are remembered is by remembering others. So if you are reading about something that a client of yours is also interested in, just share it with that person and let them know it reminded you of them, or you thought they might be interested, or you wanted their opinion, etc. He/she may not have time to answer you, but he will not forget that you remembered.

Genuine interest: we all love to be remembered and cherished, regardless of whether we are in a professional or personal relationship. Taking a genuine interest in people is not as hard and time consuming as it seems. With technology today, people are increasingly connected; your clients probably have blogs, LinkedIn profiles, Facebook, so find them and follow them. Whenever they post news or content, comment on those, share their content, congratulate them on accomplishments, and be invested in helping their business succeed. You do not need to have a personal relationship with every client or former colleague, but showing interest in their success will get their empathy, will make you happier because your interactions with people are positive, and ultimately will put you under their radar.

I have recently read that your success will be directly proportional to how many people want you to succeed. I believe this to be very true. When people empathize with you, they talk about you, they are happy to recommend you and they want to be a part of your success too.

This is how I try to keep in touch with my clients and colleagues. How about you? Any other strategies?
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I have recently posted a 2-part list of 10 things that freelance translators should do every day, you can access parts 1 and 2 here. Those are a few things that I have done every day and have really helped me not only develop my business, but also helped me develop professionally. I can recommend them, because I know they work.

However, one of my readers of this post has asked a very important question: “Do you also allocate time to looking for/contacting new clients?” Do you manage to strike a balance between reading up on your specialist area and marketing?

Well, I am by no means a marketing expert, but I thought this warranted a more detailed response.

When you are a freelance translator, regardless of how you started, e.g. with lots of work, no work at all, the odd job here and there, etc., eventually you will have times of low demand. Many translators understandably struggle to cope with these times, because few of us have the extra income to just wait as long as it takes for another job. My advice in such circumstances is view these as opportunities, use them to market yourself and to devise your strategy so that you can keep marketing even when you have a lot of work again.

In this post, I am going to describe my strategy for contacting clients directly via e-mail, which is what I can easily fit into my daily schedule.

My specialist subject is medical translations. I began my career as a medical researcher, and translation was just a hobby helping my fellow researchers understand and publish research in scientific journals. Then I went on to become a full time translator and my research background led me to focus on clinical trials and market research. Given my professional history, there are a few types of companies that can benefit more from my services, such as medical market research companies, international scientific journals, pharmaceutical companies and medical translation agencies. The first step in any successful marketing campaign is identifying your “primary targets (clients)” and learning about them.

Your marketing message must always resonate with a particular client. There are no guarantees that we will always achieve that, but the best way of coming as close as possible to it, is understanding what your clients want and how they will use your services. Hence, the process of learning about your clients must be very thorough. In your research, you should determine:

–          Which of your services will be most beneficial to your clients?

–          Where are your potential clients and who are they (make sure you keep a list of all potential clients that you come across)?

–          How do they speak to their customers (e.g. language on their website)?

–          What do they charge and what do they pay for services like yours?

The knowledge you acquire at this stage will be useful in any kind of marketing campaign that you choose to do. In my particular case, I like e-mailing and have mailing lists, because I live far from my clients’ markets and phone calls and in person meetings are just not an option, at least not for my budget.

When I am happy that I know enough about my potential clients to talk to them, I then prepare my message. I know how people dislike sales e-mails, so I make them short, targeted and I also create a brochure that I attach to my messages. If the person who gets the message is interested, they can then find out more straight away, they can forward the brochure on to the decision-maker or they can go to my website and eventually contact me. I do not have time to create a new brochure every day or even every month, and even if I did, the information about me does not change that often, so I create a brochure for each type of target client. In my case, I have a brochure for medical device companies, journals, translation agencies, medical market research companies, etc.

I usually also craft an e-mail message template for each of these audiences, which I can easily access and tweak as I become aware of new potential clients.

Right, so by the time my marketing materials are ready, I not only have the means to contact potential clients quickly, but I also have lists of potential clients from my research. So what is my marketing strategy? How do I market on a daily basis?

I have set two targets, one for when I am busy and one for when I am not as busy with translation work. I say that because when I am not translating, I blog, I keep in touch with people, I study, I learn, so I can never say that I am not busy, but I am not as busy with translation work. Hence, when I am busy, I contact 10 potential new clients a day. When I am not busy, I have to contact at least 20. This is arbitrary and works for me, you need to work out what works for you.

So how do I fit that into the 10 things that I should do every day? Well, when I am reading about my industry (items 1 and 2), I often come across news and articles that relate to primary target companies. When I spot these, I quickly stop my reading, find the company’s website, locate contact details and contact them. This is quick, because my e-mail message is virtually ready; all I have to do is tailor it to that particular prospect client.

If by the time I finish my reading, I have not yet contacted the 10 or 20 potential clients, then I refer to my lists (the ones I prepared during my research, back when I had time), and contact however many companies I still need to reach my target. This usually does not take me longer than half an hour and sometimes I do it at the end of my working day, so I finish on a positive note – I have reached my target!

Mail marketing admittedly is not always the most effective form of marketing, but it is the one that I can fit into my daily schedule. After all, marketing is not my area of expertise, translation is. I find that by contacting at least 100 companies every 2 weeks, I am playing the numbers game, i.e. the response rate might be low, but I do not need 10 new clients per week, I need one or two a month, if that, so the low response rate works for me.

This is not the only way that I contact new clients, and I do not just delete the contact information for potential clients that I have already contacted, but these other strategies will be discussed in a different post.

For now, I hope you find this useful. Please share with me in the comments – what works for you? Good luck!
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This is part 2 of the 10 things freelance translators should do every day. Please click here for items 1-5.

6. Review the top three goals for your translation business. It is all very well sitting down one day, usually when you are not very busy and feel like you should do something, and writing goals for your business. However, this is a big waste of time, if you lose track of what is most important for your business. We must keep our goals in focus. It is very easy to forget about them when we are on a working spree, with enough translation work to works 10-12 hours a day, but it is no good only thinking about them when the work dries up. As translators, we love reading and translating, and it is easy to forget about all other aspects of our business when we can do just what we like, but the dry periods will come (less often the more established you are) and it is much harder dealing with those, if you have to start from scratch. This is a very quick item to tick, because if you stick a poster in your office with your three main goals and read that first thing before you start working, you have done it! Nevertheless, do not underestimate it because it is quick and easy; being constantly reminded of where you are going will make decision-making a lot easier for you. For example, one of my goals is to focus my business on medical translations, which is what I like and am good at. Hence, if I keep that in mind, it will be easy to say no to a job in a completely unrelated field, even though I have a couple of spare hours, and use those hours to contact more potential clients in my field.

7. Identify and execute one task to support each of the top three goals that you have identified. These do not need to be massive tasks or incredibly relevant. If you make sure you do at least a little something every day, in the long term you will be doing something major. For example, my current goals are 1) delivering high quality translations, 2) developing a solid and loyal client base and 3) promoting my business online consistently. So, today, my three tasks are:

1) Learning about a new CAT tool required by a client (to support goal 1)

2) In addition to steps 3-5, I will be joining and engaging in discussions in some new LinkedIn groups related to the medical industry (to support goal 2)

3) I will be updating some of my social network profiles, which have not been updated in a long time (to support goal 3).

8. Post five valuable pieces of content on all my major social media accounts. This blog post is one of my five valuable pieces of content for today, but I have also tweeted a couple of other interesting articles that I read when doing items 1-2. This step may be tied in with steps 1 and 2. For example, if you are reading an interesting post about the translation industry, you may post that to a LinkedIn group or share it on twitter. If that post gives you an idea, such as I am writing this blog post now, you should also share that with some of your social media networks. If you always approach your reading with a view to improve your knowledge and to benefit those who connect with you, than accomplishing this item will come naturally to you, because you will be excited about sharing any valuable information that you come across. My only warning is, when posting valuable content, make sure you always think about whether they reflect your professional image and fit in with the network with which you are sharing. You may find this hard to do every day though, because you may not have the time to do a lot of reading/writing every single day, so you can use a social media management tool, like Buffer or Hootsuite, to schedule and plan your posts to ensure your readers and followers hear something from you daily.

9. Read articles and post at least five comments to non-translation related topics that you are interested in. This item is not related to items 1 and 2, this is to be more like item 5. You may share some of what you read here with friends or other contacts, who are interested in the same topics as you, as a means of keeping in touch with people (see items 3 and 5). Nevertheless, essentially, not everything has to be related directly to our industry or our business. If you have other interests, make sure you read about them and develop relationships with people who like them too. This is important for your sanity and because we never know where our next business may come from. In addition, we are in the business of language, so nothing that is communicated is really off-topic for us.

10. Take a full minute (or more) to appreciate what you have and how far you have come. Even if you are fresh out of school, obtaining your education is a milestone, and you should allow yourself to feel good about that. Forgetting about giving ourselves due credit is easy, particularly during those dry periods I mentioned in item 6, but a healthy business requires healthy leadership. You will never develop a solid business, if you do not think of yourself as a worthy entrepreneur. Acknowledge your mistakes, but acknowledge what do right as well.

If you want to create a healthy habit of doing these 10 items every day, my suggestion is:

–          Start your day reviewing your goals and thinking about what you have accomplished. Allow yourself a few minutes to feel grateful for what you have and to think about what you want. Allow these feelings to guide you through your workday. (Items 6, 3 and 10)

–          Then turn on your computer and reply to all your clients (item 4). Even if you do not have the answer for what the client is asking at that time, let the client know that you are aware of his/her query and are working to find a suitable answer for it as soon as possible.

–          If you do not have a deadline looming over you soon, allow yourself 30 minutes to 1 hour to read and learn about our industry and your field of expertise (items 1 and 2). Make sure you share whatever you find useful and helpful with your networks (item 8) or with specific people who you think my find it useful (items 3 and 5).

–          Plan your day so you that you have time to do your three actions for item 7 (they may also be tied in with other items depending on your goals) and so that you have time for breaks. In your breaks, phone a friend (item 5), see someone for lunch or just read/watch something that you find interesting (item 9)

Let me know if you find this useful, there are many other ideas to share! Good luck!

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