Marketing for translators – Mailing

I have recently posted a 2-part list of 10 things that freelance translators should do every day, you can access parts 1 and 2 here. Those are a few things that I have done every day and have really helped me not only develop my business, but also helped me develop professionally. I can recommend them, because I know they work.

However, one of my readers of this post has asked a very important question: “Do you also allocate time to looking for/contacting new clients?” Do you manage to strike a balance between reading up on your specialist area and marketing?

Well, I am by no means a marketing expert, but I thought this warranted a more detailed response.

When you are a freelance translator, regardless of how you started, e.g. with lots of work, no work at all, the odd job here and there, etc., eventually you will have times of low demand. Many translators understandably struggle to cope with these times, because few of us have the extra income to just wait as long as it takes for another job. My advice in such circumstances is view these as opportunities, use them to market yourself and to devise your strategy so that you can keep marketing even when you have a lot of work again.

In this post, I am going to describe my strategy for contacting clients directly via e-mail, which is what I can easily fit into my daily schedule.

My specialist subject is medical translations. I began my career as a medical researcher, and translation was just a hobby helping my fellow researchers understand and publish research in scientific journals. Then I went on to become a full time translator and my research background led me to focus on clinical trials and market research. Given my professional history, there are a few types of companies that can benefit more from my services, such as medical market research companies, international scientific journals, pharmaceutical companies and medical translation agencies. The first step in any successful marketing campaign is identifying your “primary targets (clients)” and learning about them.

Your marketing message must always resonate with a particular client. There are no guarantees that we will always achieve that, but the best way of coming as close as possible to it, is understanding what your clients want and how they will use your services. Hence, the process of learning about your clients must be very thorough. In your research, you should determine:

–          Which of your services will be most beneficial to your clients?

–          Where are your potential clients and who are they (make sure you keep a list of all potential clients that you come across)?

–          How do they speak to their customers (e.g. language on their website)?

–          What do they charge and what do they pay for services like yours?

The knowledge you acquire at this stage will be useful in any kind of marketing campaign that you choose to do. In my particular case, I like e-mailing and have mailing lists, because I live far from my clients’ markets and phone calls and in person meetings are just not an option, at least not for my budget.

When I am happy that I know enough about my potential clients to talk to them, I then prepare my message. I know how people dislike sales e-mails, so I make them short, targeted and I also create a brochure that I attach to my messages. If the person who gets the message is interested, they can then find out more straight away, they can forward the brochure on to the decision-maker or they can go to my website and eventually contact me. I do not have time to create a new brochure every day or even every month, and even if I did, the information about me does not change that often, so I create a brochure for each type of target client. In my case, I have a brochure for medical device companies, journals, translation agencies, medical market research companies, etc.

I usually also craft an e-mail message template for each of these audiences, which I can easily access and tweak as I become aware of new potential clients.

Right, so by the time my marketing materials are ready, I not only have the means to contact potential clients quickly, but I also have lists of potential clients from my research. So what is my marketing strategy? How do I market on a daily basis?

I have set two targets, one for when I am busy and one for when I am not as busy with translation work. I say that because when I am not translating, I blog, I keep in touch with people, I study, I learn, so I can never say that I am not busy, but I am not as busy with translation work. Hence, when I am busy, I contact 10 potential new clients a day. When I am not busy, I have to contact at least 20. This is arbitrary and works for me, you need to work out what works for you.

So how do I fit that into the 10 things that I should do every day? Well, when I am reading about my industry (items 1 and 2), I often come across news and articles that relate to primary target companies. When I spot these, I quickly stop my reading, find the company’s website, locate contact details and contact them. This is quick, because my e-mail message is virtually ready; all I have to do is tailor it to that particular prospect client.

If by the time I finish my reading, I have not yet contacted the 10 or 20 potential clients, then I refer to my lists (the ones I prepared during my research, back when I had time), and contact however many companies I still need to reach my target. This usually does not take me longer than half an hour and sometimes I do it at the end of my working day, so I finish on a positive note – I have reached my target!

Mail marketing admittedly is not always the most effective form of marketing, but it is the one that I can fit into my daily schedule. After all, marketing is not my area of expertise, translation is. I find that by contacting at least 100 companies every 2 weeks, I am playing the numbers game, i.e. the response rate might be low, but I do not need 10 new clients per week, I need one or two a month, if that, so the low response rate works for me.

This is not the only way that I contact new clients, and I do not just delete the contact information for potential clients that I have already contacted, but these other strategies will be discussed in a different post.

For now, I hope you find this useful. Please share with me in the comments – what works for you? Good luck!
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Share This:

Comments ( 10 )

        • Thandi House says:

          Hello,

          Thanks for answering my question in such detail! I have been pondering the creation of a brochure for a while and having read this entry, I am all the more convinced that it would be a beneficial task to complete.

          I love your method of contacting people/companies that crop up in your reading – I suppose that has the added advantage that you may be able to refer to the document if appropriate.

          I’m inspired to put together some materials and to set myself the challenge of contacting those potential clients! Thank you.

        • admin says:

          Hi Thandi,
          I am really glad that my experience has inspired you! Indeed I tend to use the article/news in my message when possible to make it more relevant to the reader. Good luck and please let me know how it goes!

        • Weekly favorites (May 2-8) | Lingua Greca Translations says:

          […] #eliand 2014 in Riga Choose a clearly defined target market Bad habits that hold freelancers back Marketing for translators – Mailing How Not to Approach a Translator Future of translation industry Specialising is for the Strong Keep […]

        • Marketing for translators - Mailing | LinguaGre... says:

          […] I have recently posted a 2-part list of 10 things that freelance translators should do every day, you can access parts 1 and 2 here.  […]

        • Ajay says:

          Your suggestions are nice, but as a Medical translator (Eng to Hindi), I do the same thing, but still not getting the direct client.
          Regards

        • admin says:

          Hi Ajay,

          This is a long term thing, most of the time I don’t get immediate answers or I get immediate answers, but no immediate jobs. I have clients who I contacted as described in this post, who held my information for over a year before needing my services. Remember that this is only one strategy and should not be your only, you should also contact agencies because they usually have more steady work flows.

          If you want to improve this approach, maybe consider rewriting your marketing information, changing how you present yourself, etc. All of these things can affect your response rates.

          Good luck!

        • Marketing for translators - Mailing - EAP | Med... says:

          […] I have recently posted a 2-part list of 10 things that freelance translators should do every day, you can access parts 1 and 2 here. Those are a few things that I have done every day and have really helped me not only develop my business, but also helped me develop professionally. I can recommend  […]

        • Marketing for translators: Mailing | Translatio... says:

          […] I have recently posted a 2-part list of 10 things that freelance translators should do every day, you can access parts 1 and 2 here. Those are a few things that I have done every day and have really helped me not only develop my business, but also helped me develop professionally. I can recommend  […]

        • victoria says:

          Thank you Karen for sharing your skills, I’ve been thinking of doing this, but now, with your tips, I will go right on.
          Thanks,
          Victoria.

        • admin says:

          I am glad my post has inspired you to try Victoria! Good luck and let me know how you get on! Karen

        Leave A Comment

        Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *